Ol' Buffalo Garden Planting Guide

Copyright © 2003, 2017 by Blaine S Nay, Cedar City, Utah, USA
Serving the online community since 1992.

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An excellent source of gardening knowlege.

Garden Planting and Watering Guide

Sorted by crop name. Optimized for Cedar City, Utah (Average Date of Last Frost - 20 May)
Click here for chart in printable format (PDF)

Crop

Start Plants Indoors (10) Plant Outdoors Germ Time (days) Germ Temp (°F) Min Soil Temp (°F)

Optimum Growing Temp (°F)

Light

Plants Per Ft2

Soil / Hydroponic Conditions

Critical Time To Water Gallons Needed For A 5-ft row
Artichoke --         65-80

Not directly under

1

perlite 10 inches or deeper

   
Asparagus -- Feb 6 14-21 70-75           As ferns begin to grow their foliage  
Basil (9) 6 wks

(8 Apr)

                   
Beans (1,8) -- After danger of frost past (Apr 15, Jul 1 (11)) 7-10 65-85 (14) 57 60-65

Needs good light

5

4 inches deep or deeper with plenty of moisture

Beginning at pollination and continuing through pod development, during harvesting 2 per week depending on rainfall
Beets (2,8) -- 3-4 weeks after last frost (Mar 15, Aug 15 (11)) 5-14 55-85 (12)           Before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Broccoli (2,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7, Aug 1 (11)) 5-14 70-75 (12)   55-65

Needs good light

2

Cut 5" from top and will continue to produce

During the time the heads begin to develop. Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Brussels Sprouts (2,9) 4-8 wks

(25 Mar - 24 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 5-14 70-75 (12)           Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Cabbage (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 5-14 70-75 (12) 55 (45° for transplant) 55-65

Needs good light

2

2.5" deep or deeper

During the time the heads begin to develop. Water frequently in dry weather 2 per week
Carrots (2,8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 7, Jul 7 (11)) 10-21 55-85 (12) 46 60-85

Moderate light

2

Good drainage required

As roots begin to enlarge. Water before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Cauliflower (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 15, Jul 1 (11)) 8-10 70-75 (12)   60-70 Needs good light 1 2.5" deep or deeper During flowering and head development. Water frequently 2 per week
Celeriac (9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

                   
Celery (3,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Mar 7, Aug 15 (11)) 10-21 55-70 (13)    

 

    Water frequently 2 per week
Chives (9) 8-12 wks

(26 Feb - 25 Mar)

                   
Collards (8) --   5-10 65-85 (12)              
Corn (1,8) -- (Apr 1, Jul 7 (11)) 5-7 70-85 (14) 65 60-70

Needs great light

3

6" deep or deeper with great drainage

As ear silk develops and tassels become apparent, when cobs swell 2 at important stages
Cucumbers (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 7 (11)) 5-10 70-85 (14) 58 75-85

Good light

2

4 to 6" deep or deeper

During flowering as well as through fruit development. Water frequently 1 per week
Eggplant (9) 8-10 wks

(11 Mar - 25 Mar)

(Apr 7 (11)) 10-15 70 (14)           During flowering as well as through fruit development  
Endive (8) --                    
Garlic --         80 then 60

Good light

3

4" deep or deeper - sand with high initial temp cooling off

   
Kale (8) -- (Mar 7, Aug 15 (11))                  
Kohlrabi (8) --                    
Leeks (9) 8-12 wks

(26 Feb - 25 Mar)

(Mar 7 (11))                  
Lettuce (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 1, Jul 17 (11)) 7-10 70 (13) 41 55-70

Moderate light

6

Grow with rockwool sitting on styrofoam in water

As heads begin to develop. Water frequently 2 per week
Melons (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 5-7 75-85 (14)           During flowering and evenly throughout fruit development 1 per week
Mustard Greens (8) --                    
Onions (2,9) 10-12 wks

(26 Feb - 11 Mar)

(Mar 1 (11)) 10-14 70-75 (13) 41 60-80

Good light

3

4 inches or deeper within aggregate or sand

When bulbs begin to enlarge, in dry weather, water in early stage to get plants going 1/2 to 1 per week if soil is very dry
Parsley (9) 8 wks

(25 Mar)

Feb 10 14-21 70-75              
Parsnips (2,8) -- (Mar 7 (11))               Before soil gets bone-dry 1 per week in early stages
Peas (1,8) -- 2 weeks before last date of frost (Mar 7, Aug 7 (11)) 5-10 50-75 (13) 42 60-65

Good light

4

4" deep or deeper in aggregate with good aeration

When flowers form, during pod forming, during harvesting 2 per week
Peppers (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 1 (11)) 7-14 75-85 (14) 62 (57° for transplant)         For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week
Potatoes (1,8) -- (Apr 1 (11))   70 (12) 45 60-70

Fair light

3

12" deep or deeper with good drainage

When the size of marbles 2 per week
Pumpkin (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 23 (11)) 7-10 70-75 (14) 60 70-80

Good light

1

Sow seed direct

   
Radishes (8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 7, Jul 17 (11)) 4-6 50-85 (13) 40            
Spinach (3,8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 15, Aug 1, Jul 17 (11)) 5-10 65 (13) 38 60-65

Cool shaded

3

4" deep or deeper using rockwool or sand or perlite

Water frequently 2 per week
Squash (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Apr 15 (11)) 5-10 70-85 (14)           Water frequently 1 per week
Strawberry --         60-65

Good light

6

Troughs filled with gravel 6" to 8" deep

   
Sunflower         60            
Sweet potatoes -- (Apr 21 (11))                  
Swiss Chard (8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 15 (11)) 5-14 55-85 (12)              
Tomatoes (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 7 (11)) 5-14 70-85 (14) 60 (57° for transplant) 70-75

Great light

3

Rockwool with trellis or something to hold them up

For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week or more
Turnips (8) -- (Mar 15, Aug 1 (11)) 7-10 60-85              
Wheat -- (Mar 1, Sep 15 (11))       60-70

Good light

8

Humus; significant moisture but not flooding

   
Zucchini (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 70-75 (14)   75-85

Good light

0.5

Aggregate culture with constant supply of moisture

   

Notes:

  1. This crop needs water at critical stages of development

  2. This crop does not need frequent watering

  3. This crop needs a lot of water during dry spells

  4. Climate and soil differences may dictate modifications of this guide.

  5. This guide assumes fertile, well-balanced soil. Increase frequency during hot, dry periods or if soil is low in humus. Watering levels for heavy clay soil must also be modified (it's best to lighten the soil with organic mater and sand before planting).

  6. Don't over-water! Applying excessive water to the garden is wasteful and often reduces harvest quality or yield. Use only as much water as needed for a good harvest. If you observe plants beginning to wilt, increase the watering frequency and/or volume to a level that avoids wilting.

  7. Plant crops with similar water needs together to avoid over-watering or under-watering crops with incompatible water needs.

  8. Vegetable seeds best sown in the ground.

  9. Vegetables best started indoors and transplanted.

  10. Table gives number of weeks before last frost in Spring to start seeds for transplanting.

  11. Planting dates in parentheses are for Cedar City, Utah.

  12. Tolerates cool nights for germination.

  13. Requires cool nights for germination.

  14. Requires warm nights for germination.




Garden Planting and Watering Guide

Sorted by indoor sowing date. Optimized for Cedar City, Utah (Average Date of Last Frost - 20 May)

Crop

Start Plants Indoors(10) Plant Outdoors Germ Time (days) Germ Temp (°F)

Optimum Growing Temp (°F)

Light

Plants Per Ft2

Soil / Hydroponic Conditions

Critical Time To Water Gallons Needed For A 5-ft row
Onions (2,9) 10-12 wks

(26 Feb - 11 Mar)

(Mar 1 (11)) 10-14 70-75 60-80

Good light

3

4 inches or deeper within aggregate or sand

When bulbs begin to enlarge, in dry weather, water in early stage to get plants going 1/2 to 1 per week if soil is very dry
Chives (9) 8-12 wks

(26 Feb - 25 Mar)

                 
Leeks (9) 8-12 wks

(26 Feb - 25 Mar)

(Mar 7 (11))                
Eggplant (9) 8-10 wks

(11 Mar - 25 Mar)

(Apr 7 (11)) 10-15 70         During flowering as well as through fruit development  
Parsley (9) 8 wks

(25 Mar)

Feb 10 14-21 70-75            
Celeriac (9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

                 
Celery (3,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Mar 7, Aug 15 (11))      

 

    Water frequently 2 per week
Peppers (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 1 (11)) 10 75-80         For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week
Tomatoes (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 7 (11)) 5-8 70-75 70-75

Great light

3

Rockwool with trellis or something to hold them up

For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week or more
Brussels Sprouts (2,9) 4-8 wks

(25 Mar - 24 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 10-14 70-75         Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Cabbage (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 10-14 70-75 55-65

Needs good light

2

2.5" deep or deeper

During the time the heads begin to develop. Water frequently in dry weather 2 per week
Cauliflower (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 15, Jul 1 (11)) 8-10 70-75 60-70 Needs good light 1 2.5" deep or deeper During flowering and head development. Water frequently 2 per week
Cucumbers (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 7 (11)) 7-10 70 75-85

Good light

2

4 to 6" deep or deeper

During flowering as well as through fruit development. Water frequently 1 per week
Lettuce (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 1, Jul 17 (11)) 7-10 70 55-70

Moderate light

6

Grow with rockwool sitting on styrofoam in water

As heads begin to develop. Water frequently 2 per week
Melons (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 5-7 75         During flowering and evenly throughout fruit development 1 per week
Pumpkin (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 23 (11)) 7-10 70-75 70-80

Good light

1

Sow seed direct

   
Squash (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 70-75         Water frequently 1 per week
Zucchini (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 70-75 75-85

Good light

0.5

Aggregate culture with constant supply of moisture

   
Broccoli (2,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7, Aug 1 (11)) 10-14 70-75 55-65

Needs good light

2

Cut 5" from top and will continue to produce

During the time the heads begin to develop. Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week

Notes:

  1. This crop needs water at critical stages of development

  2. This crop does not need frequent watering

  3. This crop needs a lot of water during dry spells

  4. Climate and soil differences may dictate modifications of this guide.

  5. This guide assumes fertile, well-balanced soil. Increase frequency during hot, dry periods or if soil is low in humus. Watering levels for heavy clay soil must also be modified (it's best to lighten the soil with organic mater and sand before planting).

  6. Don't over-water! Applying excessive water to the garden is wasteful and often reduces harvest quality or yield. Use only as much water as needed for a good harvest. If you observe plants beginning to wilt, increase the watering frequency and/or volume to a level that avoids wilting.

  7. Plant crops with similar water needs together to avoid over-watering or under-watering crops with incompatible water needs.

  8. Vegetable seeds best sown in the ground.

  9. Vegetables best started indoors and transplanted.

  10. Table gives number of weeks before last frost in Spring to start seeds for transplanting.

  11. Planting dates in parentheses are for Cedar City, Utah.


Minerals and the Roles They Play

During growth the plant uses water and oxygen to change carbon and nitrogen into things it can use. During growth the plant produces many things such as sugars, starch, cellulose, acids, lignin, tannins, amino acids, proteins, amides etc., and many plants also produce toxins such as alkaloids, nicotine, etc. The plant has to take in enough water to keep these activities going. Water is essential in the uptake of nutrients.

Essential plant processes

  • Absorption
  • Carbon assimilation
  • Formation of protoplasm
  • Transpiration

Major elements (high use):

  • Nitrogen - The major plant element. Nitrogen compounds comprise from 40 to 50% of the dry matter of the living substance of plant cells.
  • Phosphorus - This element, like nitrogen, is closely concerned with the vital growth processes in plants. Phosphorus is also of special importance in the processes concerned in root development and the ripening of seeds and fruits.
  • Calcium - One of its main functions is as a constituent of the cell wall.
  • Magnesium - A constituent of chlorophyll, and is essential to the formation of this pigment. Like iron in human blood/hemoglobin.
  • Potassium - Role not clearly understood.
  • Sulfur - Seems to be connected with chlorophyll formation.

Trace elements (low use but still high importance):

  • Iron - Closely concerned with chlorophyll formation but is not a constituent of it. Its role appears in this connection to be that of a catalyst.
  • Manganese - The functions of manganese are regarded as being closely associated with those of iron.
  • Boron
  • Copper - Role about the same as iron.
  • Zinc - Role about the same as iron.
  • Molybdenum

Beneficial but not essential:

  • Sodium - Seems to affect the water relations of plants and often enables sugar beet and other crops to withstand drought conditions which would otherwise produce severe adverse effects.
  • Chlorine
  • Silicon

Aluminum occurs in plants but doesn’t really serve a role. It does exert indirect influences on nutritional processes such as using aluminum sulfate.

The nutrient elements can only be absorbed by plants when present in certain forms: nitrogen from nitrates and ammonium salts; phosphorus from phosphates; calcium, magnesium and potassium from their salts (eg, as sulfates or chlorides, etc.); sulfur from sulfates; iron from ferrous or ferric salts more readily from ferrous salts); manganese from manganous salts; boron from borates; copper and zinc from their salts, and molybdenum from molybdates.

There may appear to be certain exceptions. For instance, nitrogen may be applied to a soil as “organic” nitrogen, as in hoof meal or urea, and sulfur may be added as the element itself, as in flowers of sulfur, ground sulfur, etc. In such conditions the added materials are, however, converted into the nitrate and sulfate forms respectively by soil organisms before being absorbed by the plants.

Further points of importance in connection with the absorption of the mineral nutrients by plants are as follows:

  • The minerals have to be diluted.
  • Certain of the elements slow down the absorption of others into the plant.
  • Healthy plants result when the nutrients are absorbed in certain relative proportions.
  • Nutrients, even though present in the nutrient solution in satisfactory amounts and proportions, may not be absorbed by the plant unless the “reaction” of the solution as regards acidity and alkalinity is satisfactory.

Signs of faulty nutrition in plants:

  • Changing color of leaves – yellowing Wilting or leaves or browning.
  • Thickness of stems or size of leaves.
  • Blossom end rot.
  • Insufficient flower or fruit set.

Search GardenWeb for:


Garden Planting and Watering Guide

Sorted by outdoor sowing / transplant date. Optimized for Cedar City, Utah (Average Date of Last Frost - 20 May)

Crop

Start Plants Indoors (10) Plant Outdoors Germ Time (days) Germ Temp (°F)

Optimum Growing Temp (°F)

Light

Plants Per Ft2

Soil / Hydroponic Conditions

Critical Time To Water Gallons Needed For A 5-ft row
Asparagus -- Feb 6 14-21 70-75         As ferns begin to grow their foliage  
Parsley (9) 8 wks

(25 Mar)

Feb 10 14-21 70-75            
Lettuce (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 1 (11)) 7-10 70 55-70

Moderate light

6

Grow with rockwool sitting on styrofoam in water

As heads begin to develop. Water frequently 2 per week
Onions (2,9) 10-12 wks

(26 Feb - 11 Mar)

(Mar 1 (11)) 10-14 70-75 60-80

Good light

3

4 inches or deeper within aggregate or sand

When bulbs begin to enlarge, in dry weather, water in early stage to get plants going 1/2 to 1 per week if soil is very dry
Spring wheat -- (Mar 1 (11))     60-70

Good light

8

Humus; significant moisture but not flooding

   
Broccoli (2,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 10-14 70-75 55-65

Needs good light

2

Cut 5" from top and will continue to produce

During the time the heads begin to develop. Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Brussels Sprouts (2,9) 4-8 wks

(25 Mar - 24 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 10-14 70-75         Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Cabbage (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11)) 10-14 70-75 55-65

Needs good light

2

2.5" deep or deeper

During the time the heads begin to develop. Water frequently in dry weather 2 per week
Carrots (2,8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 7 (11)) 14-21 50-85 60-85

Moderate light

2

Good drainage required

As roots begin to enlarge. Water before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Celery (3,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Mar 7 (11))      

 

    Water frequently 2 per week
Kale (8) -- (Mar 7 (11))                
Leeks (9) 8-12 wks

(26 Feb - 25 Mar)

(Mar 7 (11))                
Parsnips (2,8) -- (Mar 7 (11))             Before soil gets bone-dry 1 per week in early stages
Peas (1,8) -- 2 weeks before last date of frost (Mar 7 (11)) 7-10 40-75 60-65

Good light

4

4" deep or deeper in aggregate with good aeration

When flowers form, during pod forming, during harvesting 2 per week
Radishes (8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 7 (11)) 4-6 45-85            
Spinach (3,8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 15 (11)) 8-10 70 60-65

Cool shaded

3

4" deep or deeper using rockwool or sand or perlite

Water frequently 2 per week
Beets (2,8) -- 3-4 weeks after last frost (Mar 15 (11)) 10-14 50-85         Before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Turnips (8) -- (Mar 15 (11)) 7-10 60-85            
Cauliflower (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Mar 15 (11)) 8-10 70-75 60-70 Needs good light 1 2.5" deep or deeper During flowering and head development. Water frequently 2 per week
Swiss Chard (8) -- As soon as soil can be worked (Mar 15 (11))                
Corn (1,8) -- (Apr 1 (11)) 5-7 65-70 60-70

Needs great light

3

6" deep or deeper with great drainage

As ear silk develops and tassels become apparent, when cobs swell 2 at important stages
Peppers (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 1 (11)) 10 75-80         For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week
Potatoes (1,8) -- (Apr 1 (11))     60-70

Fair light

3

12" deep or deeper with good drainage

When the size of marbles 2 per week
Cucumbers (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 7 (11)) 7-10 70 75-85

Good light

2

4 to 6" deep or deeper

During flowering as well as through fruit development. Water frequently 1 per week
Eggplant (9) 8-10 wks

(11 Mar - 25 Mar)

(Apr 7 (11)) 10-15 70         During flowering as well as through fruit development  
Tomatoes (1,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Apr 7 (11)) 5-8 70-75 70-75

Great light

3

Rockwool with trellis or something to hold them up

For 3-4 weeks after transplanting, when flowers form, when fruit forms 1 twice a week or more
Beans (1,8) -- After danger of frost past (Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 60-70 60-65

Needs good light

5

4 inches deep or deeper with plenty of moisture

Beginning at pollination and continuing through pod development, during harvesting 2 per week depending on rainfall
Melons (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 5-7 75         During flowering and evenly throughout fruit development 1 per week
Squash (3,8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 70-75         Water frequently 1 per week
Zucchini (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 15 (11)) 7-10 70-75 75-85

Good light

0.5

Aggregate culture with constant supply of moisture

   
Sweet potatoes -- (Apr 21 (11))                
Pumpkin (8) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

After last frost and soil thoroughly warmed (Apr 23 (11)) 7-10 70-75 70-80

Good light

1

Sow seed direct

   
Beans (1,8) -- (Jul 1 (11)) 7-10 60-70 60-65

Needs good light

5

4 inches deep or deeper with plenty of moisture

Beginning at pollination and continuing through pod development, during harvesting 2 per week depending on rainfall
Cauliflower (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Jul 1 (11)) 8-10 70-75 60-70 Needs good light 1 2.5" deep or deeper During flowering and head development. Water frequently 2 per week
Corn (1,8) -- (Jul 7 (11)) 5-7 65-70 60-70

Needs great light

3

6" deep or deeper with great drainage

As ear silk develops and tassels become apparent, when cobs swell 2 at important stages
Carrots (2,8) -- (Jul 7 (11)) 14-21 50-85 60-85

Moderate light

2

Good drainage required

As roots begin to enlarge. Water before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Lettuce (3,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Jul 17 (11)) 7-10 70 55-70

Moderate light

6

Grow with rockwool sitting on styrofoam in water

As heads begin to develop. Water frequently 2 per week
Radishes (8) -- (Jul 17 (11)) 4-6 45-85            
Spinach (3,8) -- (Jul 17 (11)) 8-10 70 60-65

Cool shaded

3

4" deep or deeper using rockwool or sand or perlite

Water frequently 2 per week
Broccoli (2,9) 4-6 wks

(8 - 22 Apr)

(Aug 1 (11)) 10-14 70-75 55-65

Needs good light

2

Cut 5" from top and will continue to produce

During the time the heads begin to develop. Don't let soil dry out for 4 weeks after transplanting 1 to 1-1/2 per week
Spinach (3,8) -- (Aug 1 (11)) 8-10 70 60-65

Cool shaded

3

4" deep or deeper using rockwool or sand or perlite

Water frequently 2 per week
Turnips (8) -- (Aug 1 (11)) 7-10 60-85            
Peas (1,8) -- (Aug 7 (11)) 7-10 40-75 60-65

Good light

4

4" deep or deeper in aggregate with good aeration

When flowers form, during pod forming, during harvesting 2 per week
Beets (2,8) -- (Aug 15 (11)) 10-14 50-85         Before soil gets bone-dry 1 at early stage; 2 every 2 weeks
Celery (3,9) 6-8 wks

(25 Mar - 8 Apr)

(Aug 15 (11))      

 

    Water frequently 2 per week
Kale (8) -- (Aug 15 (11))                
Winter wheat -- (Sep 15 (11))     60-70

Good light

8

Humus; significant moisture but not flooding

   

Notes:

  1. This crop needs water at critical stages of development

  2. This crop does not need frequent watering

  3. This crop needs a lot of water during dry spells

  4. Climate and soil differences may dictate modifications of this guide.

  5. This guide assumes fertile, well-balanced soil. Increase frequency during hot, dry periods or if soil is low in humus. Watering levels for heavy clay soil must also be modified (it's best to lighten the soil with organic mater and sand before planting).

  6. Don't over-water! Applying excessive water to the garden is wasteful and often reduces harvest quality or yield. Use only as much water as needed for a good harvest. If you observe plants beginning to wilt, increase the watering frequency and/or volume to a level that avoids wilting.

  7. Plant crops with similar water needs together to avoid over-watering or under-watering crops with incompatible water needs.

  8. Vegetable seeds best sown in the ground.

  9. Vegetables best started indoors and transplanted.

  10. Table gives number of weeks before last frost in Spring to start seeds for transplanting.

  11. Planting dates in parentheses are for Cedar City, Utah.


Lawn Watering Guide

Optimized for Cedar City, Utah

Month Duration Interval  

Month

Duration Interval
January -- -- July 25 minutes per zone every 3 days
February -- -- August 25 minutes per zone every 3 days
March -- -- September 20 minutes per zone every 5 days
April 20 minutes per zone every 5 days (10) October -- (11)
May 20 minutes per zone every 4 days November -- --
June 20 minutes per zone every 3 days December -- --

Notes:

  1. These schedules are only general recommendations for fixed spray heads. Double duration for rotary spray heads.

  2. Times are based on author's experience with his own lawn. Your mileage may vary.

  3. Each landscape has its own characteristics that affect water needs.

  4. Climate and soil differences may dictate modifications of this guide.

  5. This guide assumes fertile, well-balanced soil.

  6. Increase frequency during hot, dry periods or if soil is low in humus.

  7. Watering levels for heavy clay soil must also be modified (it's best to lighten the soil with organic mater and sand before planting).

  8. Water early in the morning when the city's water demands are typically lower (My system is set to start at 1 AM). You will also lose less water to wind drift and evaporation.

  9. Don't over-water! Applying excessive water to the turf is wasteful and reduces healthy, drought-resistant root growth. Use only as much water as needed for a green lawn. If you observe grass beginning to wilt or turn a dull, dark color, increase the watering frequency and/or volume to a level that avoids wilting.

  10. I unwinterize my sprinkler system in mid April by closing all drain valves and opening the water supply valve.

  11. I winterize my sprinkler system in early October by closing the water supply valve and draining all irrigation lines.

  12. Free irrigation scheduled customized to the characteristics of your own Utah landscape and irrigation system.

  13. State-recommended watering schedule for Cedar City.

  14. General water conservation tips.




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